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Boot camps tips


Boot camps tips

Before you go to boot camp, be sure you have taken care of the every-day issues in your life. Check with your recruiter if you have questions or are unsure about how to handle any of the following matters:
  • Who will receive your mail?
  • How will your bills be paid while you are gone?
  • Does your family have access to your finances? Bank accounts, etc.
  • Does someone know what bills are due and when?
  • Does your family know whom to contact in the event of an emergency?
  • What other things could pop up in the time you are away?
  • Have you set up a bank account prior to your arrival?
Here are some great tips for once you begin boot camp.

1. Shut Up and Listen

The basic rule of thumb is that recruits should be seen and not heard. Another way of putting it: when it comes to your Drill Instructors, don't speak until spoken to.

2. Pick Me

Be careful what you wish for. Standing out can have its rewards, but it is a double-edged sword. You won't likely be asked to volunteer for a leadership assignment, like squad leader, but if they pick you, you will find yourself responsible for not only your own performance but also those in your squad

3. You Don't Make the Rules

Don't argue with your Drill Instructors, EVER! There is no way on earth that you will win, and it will no doubt cost you in terms of extra PT.

4. Help Your Buddy

You will live, eat, sleep, fight and die as a team. That Army of One stuff is a bunch of bologna. The sooner you learn to work as a team, the sooner life will get better for you.

5. Break the Rules at Your Own Risk

There are very few rules (no smoking, no going to the movies, no drinking alcohol, etc.) unique to Boot Camp, but they do expect you to follow them.

6. Calculate your Body Mass Index

The BMI is a standard measure used to assess an individual's weight in relation to height. The standards of weight and body fat are often set for military organizations: the Navy, Air Force, Army, Marine Corps and Coast Guard, and recruits must meet these standards for enlistment or maintain membership. The normal adult BMI is 18.5 to 24.9, overweight a BMI between 25.0 and 29.9, and obesity is classified as a value of 30 or higher. Not all divisions of the Armed Forces use BMI as standard. Some branches use the body fat percentage or maximum weight. The normal body mass index for militaries is BMI 20.

The Army established a minimum and maximum weight for each age and height and recruits must meet these standards to join the army. For a man who is 5 feet 9 inches, the minimum weight for all ages is 128 pounds, and the minimum body mass index is 18.9. Maximum weight ratings vary by age and higher weight than a man at this point may, at any age, it is 186 pounds with a BMI of 27.5. For a woman who is 5 feet 4 inches, the minimum weight for all ages is 110 pounds, and the minimum body mass index is 18.9. As with men, the maximum weight varies with age and body mass index obtained ranges from 24.9 for a man of 17-20 years of age, a BMI of 25.9 for women over 40 years of age. You can calculate your body mass index at www.bestbmicalculator.com.

Air Force
As in the Army, Air Force establishes maximum weight for height requirements for all recruits. For a man who is 5 feet 9 inches tall, the maximum weight is 186 pounds, equivalent to a BMI of 27.5. For a woman who is 5 feet 4 inches tall, the maximum weight is 160 pounds, which also corresponds to a BMI of 27.5.